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Coffee Fun Facts for the World Cup 2022 Countries and their Coffee Consumption Rankings

Word Cup Participants Coffee Facts and Consumption

With the 2022 FIFA World Cup underway in Qatar, we want to acknowledge all of the countries participating and take a look at their impact, history and tastes in the world of coffee. Below, you can find a unique guide to the groups and their signature coffee based beverage and other fun facts about coffee and more. Find your favorite team and learn something new. We’ve also ranked these World Cup participants in terms of their per capita coffee consumption. We’ll let you know if there is a correlation between coffee consumption and the outcome of the World Cup!

Group A

Qatar

Qatar: Coffee in Qatar is known as Gahwa. This is made from dark roasted arabica, served black with some sugar, and poured from a traditional pot called dalla (similar to how Turkish coffee is served). Modern cafes and specialty coffee are becoming increasingly popular amongst the younger generations as well! (Source

Ecuador

Ecuador: The rich landscape of Ecuador, such as having volcanic soil and coffee growing in different altitudes, make Ecuadorian coffee some of the most well-rounded. The province of Napo is also one of the world’s biggest suppliers of instant coffee, which is made from mostly robusta beans. (Source)

Netherlands

Netherlands: The Netherlands consumed the 5th most coffee per capita in the world amounting to about 18.5 pounds (8.4 kg) of coffee per capita per year. The Netherlands also have a method of dripping cold water over coffee grounds. This method can take anywhere from 3.5 - 12 hours. You could watch up to 8 world cup games before your coffee was even ready!  (Source)

Senegal

Senegal: Senegal is said to be the origin of Cafe Touba. This is a coffee drink that was first used as part of religious ceremonies. The drink, named after the town of Touba, is a robusta coffee drink mixed with grains of Selim, a spice similar to black pepper and gives the coffee a spicy and bitter flavor profile. (Source)

Group B

England

England: King Charles II once feared that coffee would cause a revolution, and that people in coffee houses in the late 1600s were plotting against the throne; therefore, he had his ministers try to ban coffee shops. His ministers believed that coffee houses promoted free-thinking and new political ideas -- the nerve of those ministers! Culturally, however, tea still reigns number one in England. (Source)

United States

United States: Only Hawaii and California produce coffee beans. The former produces kona coffee, an arabica blend that flourishes on the island due to the volcanic soil which helps promote the growth of the beans. Kona coffee is said to have flavor notes of honey, chocolate and brown sugar. While overall the US consumes more coffee than any other country in the world, it does not make the top 10 on a per capita basis.  (Source)

Iran

Iran: Back when Iran was known as Persia, coffee was actually recommended for medicinal use. At the time, they said that consuming coffee could lower blood pressure and cure headaches. Coffee houses during the 1500s were also places of social gatherings, such as religious ceremonies and poetry readings. (Source)

Wales

Wales: Wales has been a coffee loving country for generations. In the 19th century, Italian immigrants began making coffee popular in towns across the country. One of the earliest known Welsh coffee variations is "Cennin Coffee" (Leek Coffee). This is a simple drink with a snippet of leek and a drop of honey. (Source)

 Group C

Argentina

Argentina: Argentia almost takes its coffee as seriously as it takes its fútbol. Due to the influence of the Italians, espresso is one of the most popular coffee-based drinks in Argentina. One of the most signature Agentinian drinks is the Cafe En Jarrito. Essentially it is a double espresso, served in a slightly larger espresso cup or mini mug. (Source)

Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia: In Saudi Arabia, coffee is more than just a drink, it is an ancient tradition of hospitality. It is believed that the people living in the Sarawat Mountains region began roasting and consuming coffee in the 15th century. Coffee hospitality is a tradition that creates social bonds. Small cups of piping hot coffee require constant attention and refilling to show respect to guests. (Source)

Mexico

Mexico: The 8th ranked coffee producer in the world, Mexico’s coffee production is made up of 97% arabica and 3% robusta. A popular coffee drink in Mexico is the Cafe de olla. This is coffee that is brewed in clay pots because many of them believe that the earthiness of the clay pots helps bring out more of the flavor in the coffee. The coffee is also brewed with cinnamon and piloncillo, raw brown sugar. (Source)

Poland

Poland: Coffee was once believed to be a devilish drink. People believed that because of the bitter taste and the dark color, it was used to “twist the Christian face” in the late 1600s. Attitudes about coffee in Poland have shifted greatly over time as Poland now consumes 5.5 pounds (2.5 kg) per capita per year. (Source)

 Group D

Denmark

Denmark: It was reported in 2022 that the average Dane drinks more coffee per year than any other nation participating in the World Cup (4th amongst all countries). That’s 19.2 pounds (8.7 kg) of coffee per capita per year. Maybe that's why they are also consistently ranked as one of the happiest countries in the world! (Source)

Tunisia

Tunisia: Coffee in Tunisia has very heavy Ottoman and Andalusian (southern region of Spain) influences. Their coffee is served in a pot similar to that of Turkish coffee, but the way they roast their coffee has very Spanish-like roots and notes. (Source)

France

France: In France, it’s frowned upon to ask for milk with your coffee when it’s past the morning. This is because they say it interferes with your digestion. The French also choose to savor their coffee, so you’ll rarely see someone walking down the street with a cup in hand. (Source)

Australia

Australia: The coffee culture in Australia is considered by many the most advanced in the world. The country embraces the third-wave coffee movement which focuses on higher quality in each stage of the coffee-making process and experience. The city of Melbourne has more coffee shops per person than any other city in the world. Despite their passion for coffee, Australians don't seem to over indulge as they do not rank in the top 25 coffee-consuming per capita countries in the world. (Source)

 Group E

Spain

Spain: One of the most common ways that Spanish people roast their beans is a method called torrefacto, meaning that their coffee beans are roasted with sugar. It’s become the standard of how people in Spain expect their coffee. This ends up giving their coffee a more bitter taste. Café con leche (espresso or strong coffee mixed with an equal amount of scalded milk) also originated in Spain and is commonly served across the country.  (Source)

Germany

Germany: The world’s first ever drip coffee machine known as the Wigomat was invented in 1954 by Gottlob Widmann. This machine was made to help brew coffee grounds at the ideal temperature, and was originally known as FK-1. Germans consume the second most coffee in the world overall, but do not make the top 10 on a per capita basis.   (Source)

Japan

Japan: Canned coffee with milk was first invented in Japan in April 1969. This was introduced by Tadao Ueshima, founder of UCC Ueshima Coffee Company. Overall Japan consumes the third most coffee in the world and is the largest importer of coffee in Asia.  (Source)

Costa Rica

Costa Rica: Coffee is so integral to Costa Rican culture that there have actually been laws passed stating that only arabica beans can be grown throughout the country. This also helps make Costa Rican coffee some of the most popular coffee around the world. Costa Rica is the 14th largest producer in the world. (Source)

 Group F

Croatia

Croatia: Though bringing a nice bottle of wine is common practice when visiting someone’s home, bringing a brick-shaped pack of coffee from Franck, the country’s oldest coffee roaster, is a more welcome gift when visiting the home of a Croatian. (Source)

Morocco

Morocco: The Nous-Nous, which is 1 part milk and 1 part espresso, is the preferred coffee order for many Moroccans. The coffee culture in Morocco is relatively young compared to the rest of the world as many locals would prefer to drink the Moroccan mint tea. (Source)

Belgium

Belgium: The city of Antwerp is home to the largest storage of green coffee in the world. The Belgian city actually stores about 250,000 tons of unroasted coffee, which equates to about 27 billion cups of coffee. Belgians consumed the 8th most coffee per capita in the world amounting to 15 pounds (6.8 kg) of coffee per person.  (Source)

Canada

Canada: According to a report by the Coffee Association of Canada, coffee is the most consumed beverage by most Canadians, with 71% reportedly drinking coffee daily. This beats out tap water which only came in at 63%. Despite being more popular than water, 9 other countries still consume more coffee per capita than Canadians.  (Source)

 Group G

Switzerland

Switzerland: One of the world’s first instant coffee brands, Nescafe, was invented in Switzerland in 1938 by Swiss chemist Max Morgenthaler. The Swiss are the 7th heaviest coffee drinking nation per capita in the world. (Source)

Cameroon

Cameroon: A certain type of arabica called “Boyo” is grown in the northwestern part of Cameroon. This coffee is mildly acidic and has a chocolate aftertaste. These beans are grown in elevations of up to 5,000 feet and with rich volcanic soil. (Source)

Brazil

Brazil: Brazil is the world’s biggest producer of coffee. The country produces about a third of the coffee in the world. At one point, Brazil produced up to 80% of the world’s coffee. The 60 kg bags that Brazil became known for is used as the standard to measure coffee production and trade. (Source)

Serbia

Serbia: It is widely believed that the first coffee shop or kafana was opened up in Belgrade, Serbia. This was opened up during the Ottoman empire about a century before they opened up in other parts of Europe. (Source)

Group H

Uruguay

Uruguay: Although they enjoy their fair share of coffee, Uruguay is one of the only Latin American countries that does not produce coffee. The weather in Uruguay is too cool for the coffee trees to thrive and mate is the most popular beverage to drink. (Source)

South Korea

South Korea: Coffee experts, known as Q-graders, are very active in South Korea. There are about 5,000 Q-graders worldwide, and over half of them are South Korean or based in South Korea, showing how seriously they take their coffee. (Source)

Portugal

Portugal: The term for an espresso in Lisbon, which is bica, is believed to come from the acronym “beba isso com açúcar” which means “drink this with sugar.” The locals did this because when they first consumed coffee, they couldn’t understand why the coffee was so bitter. (Source)

Ghana

Ghana: While coffee isn’t known to come from Ghana, the government of Ghana has started to put plans into place to have the coffee industry in Ghana grow slowly but surely. Of the World Cup participants, Ghanians drink the least amount of coffee per capita. (Source)


Coffee Consumption per Capita Ranking of World Cup Participants

Per Capita Coffee Consumption Ranking


World Cup Participant

Per Capita Coffee Consumption1 (lbs/yr)

World Cup Power Ranking2

1

Denmark

Denmark

19.2

8

2

Netherlands

Netherlands

18.5

7

3

Switzerland

Switzerland

17.4

14

4

Belgium

Belgium

15.0

9

5

Canada

Canada

14.3

27

6

Germany

Germany

13.7

3

7

Costa Rica

Costa Rica

13.4

28

8

Brazil

Brazil

12.8

1

9

France

France

11.9

5

10

Portugal

Portugal

11.6

11

11

Croatia

Croatia

11.2

10

12

Spain

Spain

9.9

4

13

United States

United States

9.3

18

14

Serbia

Serbia

8.8

16

15

Japan

Japan

7.5

24

16

England

England

6.2

6

17

Tunisia

Tunisia

6.0

30

18

Poland

Poland

5.5

13

19

Wales

Wales

5.3

17

20

South Korea

South Korea

4.5

20

21

Australia

Australia

4.2

31

22

Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia

3.9

32

23

Mexico

Mexico

3.1

19

24

Morocco

Morocco

2.4

22

25

Ecuador

Ecuador

2.2

21

26

Argentina

Argentina

1.9

2

27

Uruguay

Uruguay

1.5

12

28

Senegal

Senegal

1.4

15

29

Cameroon

Cameroon

0.8

25

30

Iran

Iran

0.4

26

31

Qatar

Qatar

0.2

29

32

Ghana

Ghana

0.02

23


1 Coffee consumption statistics from the International Coffee Organization and Helgi Library

2 World Cup 2022 Power Rankings


For more interesting coffee facts, see Coffee Origins (Top 20 Coffee Producing Countries)



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